President Lyndon B. Johnson signs into law the historic Civil Rights

Posted on Updated on

In 1964, U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson’s signed law was 90 days into effect. The historic Civil Rights Act was nationally televised in a ceremony at the White House on July 2, 1964 is when the bill was originally signed.

The act didn’t help just black Americans

Women, religious minorities, Latinos and whites also benefited from the Civil Rights Act, which would later serve as a model for other anti-discrimination measures passed by Congress, including the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Pregnancy Discrimination Act.

images0UTK8USJ

President Lyndon B. Johnson signs into law the historic Civil Rights Act

In the landmark 1954 case Brown v. Board of Education, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that racial segregation in schools was unconstitutional. The 10 years that followed saw great strides for the African-American civil rights movement, as non-violent demonstrations won thousands of supporters to the cause. Memorable landmarks in the struggle included the Montgomery bus boycott in 1955–sparked by the refusal of Alabama resident Rosa Parks to give up her seat on a city bus to a white woman–and Martin Luther King, Jr.’s famous “I have a dream” speech at a rally of hundreds of thousands in Washington, D.C., in 1963.

Follow us on Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/pages/One-1-World/132992030077890
Follow us on Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/pages/One-1-World/132992030077890
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s