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Will history be kind to Barack Obama’s Legacy as a Black President, many say no!

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History was changed-on election night November 4th, 2008, when a more youthful Barack Obama walked out to as the newly elected American President with his wife and young daughters by his side, every step thereafter seemed by many to represent a great leap of racial progress by citizens of the United States. I  agree with British historian Arnold Toynbee-who warned historians against trying to understand the present—let alone imagining what historians would say about current events in the future.

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There are those who say, President Obama did not do enough to elevate or even fight for the rights of African-American people, they would suggest the antagonism of Obama’s own blackness was not provoked; still others, may suggest- the way in which his racial self-consciousness constrained him, not as to openly advocate in an effort to avoid showing any resemblance of outright favoritism toward his own race. In an article for NYmagzone.com when 53 Historians weighted in on the Presidency of Barack Obama (link Below) it was suggested that we will care a great deal less about his race generations from now — just as John F. Kennedy’s Catholicism hardly matters to current students of history.
 
If the “Legacy,” of Barack as President is to be challenged, then should we consider questions about Barack Obama’s sojourn in Kenya, the land of his father. In Kenya, where President Obama is saluted as an absolute “Hero,”-coming after un-numbered African generations suffer the agonies of enforced servitude and historical exile, a favored native son, blood of the land, who returns in triumph to claim the mantle of “world leader and heroic figure.” Without a doubt, White House spin doctors would love to have this story told. Yet notwithstanding the tired cynicism of the political age and the familiarity of Obama’s much-told personal journey, this remarkable reversal of fortunes, briefly glimpsed and savored, remains genuinely uplifting.(photoshoped Kenyan version of President Obama source unknown, below)
 
Barack with Braids (photoshoped) source unknown
Kenyan version of Barack with Braids (photoshoped) source unknown
In post 2012 America, So great has been the increase in political power that the black voter turnout rate surpassed that of whites with the 2012 presidential race, and the number of black elected officials has risen sevenfold. But while school segregation and workplace discrimination have declined, too many African-Americans go home to segregated, often impoverished neighborhoods. How much can we attribute the overwhelming number of political seats as to being inspired  by this President.
 
According to recent polls-The black poverty rate has dropped from more than 40% in the 1960s to about 27% today; child poverty similarly has dipped from 67% to about 40%. Those numbers still are glaring, however. And the gap in overall wealth is more than 5-to-1 between whites and blacks: The average white household had nearly $800,000 in assets in 2011, compared with $154,000 for blacks.
 
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Many feel that President Obama, could have been significantly instrumental in making progress on civil rights an area which has surprisingly has been much slower. Yes, it is true that today-America has many post civil rights issues to openly deal, examples being the flurry of Police Brutality issues: Tamir Rice, Eric Garner, Andrew Joseph, Freddie Gray, Mike Brown and the list goes on. We may never understand the dynamics that have been at the heart of America’s seemingly non-existent policies with Civil Rights, and why Present Obama did not do more?
 
In closing if history is to be kind  President Obama, we must consider the fact that a person of color who became the President of the United States of America has inspired many, many children and others around the world who never really believed that  they could achieve this feat, and they are now saying, “one day I’ll be President of the United States of America.” that alone has challenged the hearts of the detractors who say, “President Obama did not do enough for African-Americans.” In addition we must agree with another great President-John F. Kennedy who knew the challenge wasn’t just passing laws, but changing hearts and minds. “Law alone cannot make men see right,” he said. “We are confronted primarily with a moral issue.” We have to inspire people so change is in their hearts (a hard pressed task), I believe President Obama has accomplished this task-so in this respect-History will show President Barack Obama favor.
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The Destruction of Black Wall Street. A Lesson in History!

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One World The events that destroyed a thriving Black Oklahoma community 93 years ago were much more than a ‘race riot’

By Gregg L Greer, Editor for One World

As one of the most successful and wealthiest African American communities in the United States during the early 20th Century, it was popularly known as America’s “Black Wall Street” until the Tulsa Race Riot of 1921. The invasion was one of the most devastating massacres in the history of US race relations, destroying the once thriving Greenwood community.

The Riot and What Happened

The riot began because of the alleged assault of a white elevator operator, 17-year old Sarah Page, by an African-American shoeshiner, 19-year old Dick Rowland (the case against Mr. Rowland was eventually dismissed). The Tulsa Tribune got word of the incident and chose to publish the story in the paper on May 31, 1921. Shortly after the newspaper article surfaced, there was news that a white lynch mob was going to take matters into its own hands and kill Dick Rowland.
A group of armed white men congregated outside the jail and, subsequently, a group of African-American men joined the assembled crowd in order to protect Dick Rowland. There was an argument in which a white man tried to take a gun from a black man, and the gun fired a bullet up into the sky. This incident promoted many others to fire their guns, and the violence erupted on the evening of May 31, 1921. Whites flooded into the Greenwood district and destroyed the businesses and homes of African-American residents. No one was exempt from the violence of the white mobs; men, women, and even children were killed by the mobs.
Troops were eventually deployed on the afternoon of June 1, but by that time there was not much left of the once thriving Greenwood district. Over 600 successful businesses were lost.
 
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The Aftermath

Within five years after the massacre, surviving residents who chose to remain in Tulsa rebuilt much of the district. They accomplished this despite the opposition of many white Tulsa political and business leaders. It resumed being a vital black community until segregation was overturned by the Federal Government during the 1950s and 1960s. Desegregation encouraged blacks to live and shop elsewhere in the city, causing Greenwood to lose much of its original vitality. Since then, city leaders have attempted to encourage other economic development activity nearby.
 
“After the riot, black Tulsans, who were living in tents and forced to wear green identification tags in order to work downtown, still managed to turn the tragedy into triumph. Without state help, they rebuilt Greenwood, and by 1942 the community had more than 240 black-owned businesses.”

What Economic Discrimination means?

Investing in economic empowerment sets a direct path towards gender equality, poverty eradication and inclusive economic growth. We all must make enormous contributions to economies, whether in businesses, on farms, as entrepreneurs or employees, or by doing unpaid care work at home in order to grow. But there also exist those who are disproportionately affected by poverty, discrimination and exploitation. Economic Discrimination means people often end up in insecure, low-wage jobs, and constitute a small minority of those in senior positions. It curtails access to economic assets such as land and loans for the many. It limits participation in shaping economic and social policies. And, because some have to perform the bulk of the work load, they often have little time left to pursue economic opportunities. – Together-We must learn from the past and work toward the future.  
                
                                                         Related Articles:http://www.ebony.com/black-history/the-destruction-of-black-wall-street-405#ixzz3FTqKfYYn

http://sfbayview.com/2011/02/what-happened-to-black-wall-street-on-june-1-1921/

                                                                                                                             # (GLG10/7/S)# 

 
Guilty in Innocence Project doesn’t just reveal the outrage of human rights abuse but inspires hope for a better world through public action; we are dedicated to exonerating wrongfully convicted people through Investigation and Public Lobby. https://www.facebook.com/groups/guiltyininnocenceproject/
Guilty in Innocence Project doesn’t just reveal the outrage of human rights abuse but inspires hope for a better world through public action; we are dedicated to exonerating wrongfully convicted people through Investigation and Public Lobby.
https://www.facebook.com/groups/guiltyininnocenceproject/

 

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Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Selma to Montgomery-(A Great Moment in History)

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By Gregg L Greer, One World, Editor

On this date in 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson informed Alabama’s Governor George Wallace that he will utilize federal authority to order the Alabama National Guard to control a prepared civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery.

Bloody Sunday March
Bloody Sunday March 7, 1965

Bullying and bigotry had earlier blocked Selma’s black population–over half the city–from registering and voting.

On Sunday, March 7, 1965, a gathering of 600 demonstrators marched on the capital city of Montgomery to oppose this disenfranchisement and the earlier murder of a black man, Jimmie Lee Jackson, by a state patrolman. In brutal scenes that aired on television, state and local police assaulted the marchers with billy clubs and tear gas. TV spectators far and wide were outraged by the pictures, and a protest march was organized just forty eight hours after “Bloody Sunday” by Martin Luther King, Jr., head of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC). King directed the marchers to turn back around, nevertheless, rather than carry out the march without federal constitutional support.

After an Alabama federal judge ruled on March 18
After an Alabama federal judge ruled on March 18

After an Alabama federal judge ruled on March 18 that a third march could go forward, President Johnson and his advisers worked instantly to find a way to guarantee the protection of King and his demonstrators on their passage from Selma to Montgomery. The most compelling obstacle in their way was Governor Wallace, an outspoken anti-integrationist who was reluctant to use any state funds on guarding the demonstrators. Hours after vowing to Johnson–in phone calls recorded by the White House–that he would order out the Alabama National Guard to preserve order, Wallace went on television and charged that Johnson should send in federal troops instead.

Johnson himself was calling the guard up and giving them all required support
Johnson himself was calling the guard up and giving them all required support

Infuriated, Johnson then ordered Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach to write a press release stating that because Wallace refused to use the 10,000 prepared guardsmen to preserve order in his state, Johnson himself was calling the guard up and giving them all required support. Some days following, 50,000 marcher joined King in an amazing 54 miles, under the observant perceptions of state and federal troops.

 King delivered his famous "How Long, Not Long" speech from the steps of the Capitol building.
King delivered his famous “How Long, Not Long” speech from the steps of the Capitol building.

Entering safely in Montgomery on March 25, all attended when King delivered his famous “How Long, Not Long” speech from the steps of the Capitol building. The dispute between Johnson and Wallace–and Johnson’s decisive response–was a significant turning point in the civil rights crusade. Within five months, Congress had enacted the Voting Rights Act, which Johnson boastfully endorsed into law on August 6, 1965.

       One World     Gregg Greer a Public Speaker, Minister, and Social Activist Gregg Greer as the Editor of One World, and One World Today internet journals. you can reach him at one1worldtoday@gmail.com.

Guilty in Innocence Project -The New Movement to Exonerate George Stinney Jr. At 14 the Youngest Person executed in US History

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       The New Movement to Exonerate George Stinney Jr. Youngest Person ever executed in U.S. History

FLORIDA, September 21, 2013 —Today the Guilty in Innocence Project along with the website Causes  announced its first campaign to Exonerate and correct the historical record of seemingly innocent young man, who was the victim of one of the most horrible incidents of racial prejudice and a broken justice system in United States History

Clarendon County, South Carolina, -At fourteen years of age George Stinney Jr., a young boy with no criminal record in his entire life, who’s name now lives in infamy as the youngest person executed in U.S. History.  The case of  George Stinney Jr.  stinks of circumstantial, unproven and unsubstantiated prosecutorial testimony combined with a host of other injustices. The list of questionable characters is heavy, they  include;  a judge with double standards, a prosecutor who mislead jurors and a Defense Tax lawyer who was not trained for Defense of Capital Cases preparing for an election that dropped the ball and totally misrepresented Stinney.  Also don’t exclude the Racist Sheriff who may have been responsible fabricating the case from start to finish. The confession of George Stinney, Jr. was never recorded in police files Detectives offered the boy ice cream once they were done.

On the day of the Murders on March 23, 1944The defendant, a young George Stinney Jr. was walking his cow and happened to pass two white young white girls who were collecting “maypop” flowers. The two girls, 11-year-old Betty June Binnicker and seven-year-old Mary Emma Thames, had crossed paths with George and his sister Katherine Stinney the day the two girls would eventually go missing. Binnicker and Thames’ bodies were later found in a ditch the following morning. Their skulls shattered into pieces and their bodies were so brutally beaten with a railroad tie rod that many medical experts felt a 95 pound boy could not impose that amount of damage and not leave physical scars to him. Stinney even participated in the manhunt for the murder of the girls, mistakenly telling the posse members that he saw the two girls “down by the railroad”

The Confession of Stinneywas a historic miscarriage of justice and according to witnesses and court records the confession of George Stinney, Jr. was never recorded in police files and Three Sheriff’s offered the boy ice cream once they were done.

 To this day, no physical evidence that he committed the crime exists. His trial — if you call it that —He was convicted and sentenced in one day of court which lasted less than two hours. Prosecution Testimony included three sheriff officers who claimed that Stinney had confessed, although that was the only evidence the prosecution presented.  No outside witnesses were called. No defense evidence was presented. The boy faced his sentence without family who were forced to move away from the city for fear of lynching from the angry mobs. Stinney Jr. would be left to face trial alone 1,000 people-whites only crammed the South Carolina courthouse. Blacks weren’t allowed inside. Jury selection began at 10:00 am and a guilty verdict just after 5:00 p.m the all-White jury deliberated for all of 10 minutes in between lunch before sentencing him to death by electrocution

On June 16, 19447:30 pm Execution Day, – Stinney walked into the chamber with his bible under his right arm. The shackles did not fit the 14 year olds feet! Stinney’s frail, 5-foot-1, 95-pound when fully seated would not touch the floor. Stinney had to step up and sit on the bible as his booster seat because his small frame would not encompass the entire electric chair seat. 2,400 volts had to be sent three times into the boy’s body, and at one point his arm slipped out of the constraints. The mask was too large and slipped off his small face, exposing Stinney’s wide open tearful eyes. Within four minutes Stinney Jr. was declared dead!

fldeathrow-electric_chairGuilty in Innocence Project-Efforts to correct the History Record of the Stinney Case

According to Gregg Greer the Chair of the Guilty in Innocence Project, we must began to combat and look at wrongful convictions in America overall-According to Amnesty International Since 1973, over 130 people have been released from death rows throughout the country due to evidence of their wrongful convictions. In 2003 alone, 10 wrongfully convicted defendants were released from death row. Example-African Americans are disproportionately represented among people condemned to death in the USA. While they make up 12 per cent of the national population, they account for more than 40 per cent of the country’s current death row inmates, and one in three of those executed since 1977.

 

 Jail Hands

Factors leading to wrongful convictions include

  • Inadequate legal representation
  • Police and prosecutorial misconduct
  • Perjured testimony and mistaken eyewitness testimony
  • Racial prejudice
  • Jailhouse “snitch” testimony
  • Suppression and/or misinterpretation of mitigating evidence
  • Community/political pressure to solve a case

I believe the best way we can commemorate the birth of this poor 14-year-old boy’s short life is to take a moment to really ask ourselves would we allow any member of our own family to be treated like this, secondly we must look at the cruel form of punishment to begin with

What you can do to help clear Stinney’s Name!

Guilty in Innocence Project and Causes have a joint petition Campaign to ask President Obama to Pardon George  Stinney Jr.

Guilty in Innocence Project has a Posthumous Presidential Campaign to Pardon 14 year old George Stinney because his case reveals the outrage of human rights abuse but inspires in each one of us to strive for change of Justice Laws; we are dedicated to exonerating wrongfully convicted people to prevent future injustices. Specifically when those cases are due to racial prejudice. We also believe strongly that when we raise awareness and concern about the failings of our criminal justice system, if innocent people are imprisoned or, worse, being put to death for crimes that they did not commit, it is a facet of our society that eventually will inflame our society. We think the President will agree that year, 2015, the 71st anniversary of Stinney’s birth, is a most timely moment to correct this historic miscarriage of justice.This type of injustice should be intolerable to every American, or human being. Stand with us! Please go to causes and sign our campaign.

https://www.causes.com/campaigns/34389-exonerate-george-stinney-jr-at-14-the-youngest-person-executed-in-us-history

Greer is a member of the SCLC-Southern Christian Leadership Conference and Chair of the Guilty in Innocence Project spent 2 years in research of the case. We hope to write a final chapter in this case.  I’ve told my team that ultimately it must be our goal to protect human rights worldwide. As we enter into a new world a new day and age, we must look for change, too much pain, too many lives lost we must dedicate our lives to this cause..

You can reach Greer at .one1worldtoday@gmail.com